Carlyle executives share their views and expertise on a range of investment, public policy and economic matters through podcasts, commentaries, policy papers, TV interviews, speeches and presentations.

MARKET COMMENTARY
Financial Services in the Post-Post-Crisis Environment

Schreiber and Thomas discuss how the U.S. presidential election effectively brought the post-crisis period to a close for the financial services industry. In the new era that follows, they say they expect profound shifts in the industry and the regulations that govern it, driven in part by technology and demographic trends as well as cyclical economic trends.

Schreiber and Thomas discuss how the U.S. presidential election effectively brought the post-crisis period to a close for the financial services industry. In the…

Schreiber and Thomas discuss how the U.S. presidential election effectively brought the post…

2017 Review & Outlook: Great Expectations

2017 Review & Outlook: Great Expectations

2017 Review & Outlook: Great Expectations

2017 Review & Outlook: Great Expectations

Oil Market Commentary: Where the Past Is—and Is Not—Prologue

U.S. oil and gas companies have become a “swing producer” in global oil markets thanks to the development of new technologies that allow large volumes of incremental oil to be brought to market in relatively short order. “Breakeven” prices have declined to levels where any increase in spot prices is likely to elicit a material increase in U.S. production. But the U.S. accounts for just one-tenth of global crude oil production. The sharp decline in global exploration…

U.S. oil and gas companies have become a “swing producer” in global oil markets thanks to the development of new technologies that allow large volumes of…

U.S. oil and gas companies have become a “swing producer” in global oil markets thanks to…

Economic Outlook
Economic Outlook
(Just Like) Starting Over

By sapping confidence and depressing bank capital levels, unconventional monetary policy may create costs that exceed its modest benefits. The September shift in Bank of Japan (BOJ) policy and ongoing concerns about European banks could pave the way for a broader rethink of the conduct of monetary policy. Policymakers may focus increasingly on the steepness of the term structure rather than the absolute level of longer-term interest rates.

By sapping confidence and depressing bank capital levels, unconventional monetary policy may create costs that exceed its modest benefits. The September shift in Bank of Japan (BOJ)…

By sapping confidence and depressing bank capital levels, unconventional monetary policy may create costs that…